Game-Changing Research
Dr. Paaladinesh Thavendiranathan, Dr. Kathryn Howe, Dr. Mitesh Badiwala, and Dr. Phyllis Billia
Dr. Paaladinesh Thavendiranathan, Dr. Kathryn Howe, Dr. Mitesh Badiwala, and Dr. Phyllis Billia

Researchers at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre are discovering new ways to prevent and treat heart and vascular disease.

Imagine this: you're having a heart attack. Almost immediately, scar tissue begins to form around your heart, and it becomes permanently damaged. But what if, when you arrived at the hospital, a doctor could treat you with a drug that helped your heart generate new cells and rebuild itself? Or, imagine you have breast cancer and you're undergoing long rounds of chemo and radiation therapy, treatments that could harm your heart. Besides monitoring the cancer, your cardiologist could also detect signs of heart trouble early, adjust your chemo regimen — without inhibiting its success — while preventing you from getting heart disease, which is currently the leading cause of death in breast cancer survivors. 

Researchers are doing all this and more, pioneering cutting-edge approaches to healing damaged hearts, increasing the number of hearts available for transplant and preventing the risk of stroke. Dr. Kathryn Howe, a vascular surgeon at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, Division of Vascular Surgery, UHN Sprott Department of Surgery, says every new research finding is driven by the one question physicians ask themselves daily: "How can we have something better to offer?" Here's some of the groundbreaking work underway at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre.