Putting a halt to head hits
Dr. Charles Tator is taking a three-pronged approach to help reduce the number of concussions in Canadians.

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Dr. Charles Tator is taking a three-pronged approach to help reduce the number of concussions in Canadians.

Combatting concussions through research, education and policy

Concussions are a serious issue in sport. According to the National Football League, 13.5 per cent more concussions were reported among its players in 2017 over the year before, while Blue Cross Blue Shield found a 43 per cent increase in sports-related concussions between 2010 and 2015. That’s not a surprise to Dr. Charles Tator, director of the Canadian Concussion Centre, an organization based out of the Krembil Brain Institute that conducts concussion-related research.

​“There’s still a lack of awareness and lack of recognition around concussions,” he says. “We want to change that.”

Dr. Tator has made it his mission to reduce the number of concussions in Canada, but unlike other doctors who mostly focus on science, he’s taking a three-pronged approach to his work: Research, education and policy change. Since researchers are just starting to learn how concussions work, it could take time before any treatment is found. That’s why he wants to change laws and raise awareness of what can happen when someone gets hit in the head.​​